Michigan has been struggling to raise the amount of medical marijuana patients registering for cards throughout their state for years now. It’s a huge surprise to me because it seems like something like a card that allows you to legally purchase weed for medical use would be a big hit in the mid-west but the situation has not turned for the best. Last year, the number of identification cards for patients weighed in at 96,408, according to the numbers pulled from the Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs. In 2011 Michigan catered to 119,470 patients and 118,368 in 2013.

 

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Some of Detriot’s largest neighborhoods saw huge deficits in the past year medical card wise. In Wayne County the number dropped from 14,169 in 2013 to 12,258 last year. Oakland County’s patients dropped from 10,741 in 2013 to 9,330 in 2014. Lastly Macomb County’s number of Medical Marijuana patients dipped from 7,997 in 2013 to 7,644 last year. Michigan’s Medical Marijuana Act allows residents with serious medical conditions to legally obtain the herb, which has been going on since 2008 which was a pretty early start. Under the state law, Michigan residents can always apply for and obtain licenses to use and grow marijuana for medicinal purposes. With such an open door policy on obtaining a medical license to partake in weed consumption it’s hard for Michigan’s government to pinpoint exactly why their number of card holders continues to plummet.

The biggest finger being pointed would be towards Michigan allowing licensed people to use, grow and sell marijuana for medicinal purposes, but still making the herb illegal under federal law. Because of this matter, patients with state-issued cards have been prosecuted in the past. My assumption is that the residents of Michigan became aware of this issue and were steered away from becoming patients on record. There’s no point in being prosecuted for marijuana use with a card when stoners and patients alike would be using the products illegally or legally.

 

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