With the recent recreational legalization of Marijuana throughout the great state of Oregon, the question still arises when the legality of players in the NCAA can self medicating.

 
As a sports advocate as well as an avid stoner I don’t believe that it’s fair to persecute players who reside in states where Marijuana is legal for medical or recreational use when administering NCAA approved drug tests.

This poses to be a huge question throughout the organization, especially dude to the fact that there are now four states that have legalized the herb along with twenty three other states that have approved the medical use of Cannabis.

Two Players on the Oregon Ducks football team unfortunately failed to pass NCAA drug tests administered at the Rose Bowl and we’re suspended for the title game. Darren Carrington, a freshman wide receiver and Ayele Forde, a senior special teams player, both tested positive for marijuana use which stopped them from playing one of the biggest games of the year.

This hurt the teams performance in the long run, all over the use of a completely legal way to medicate.

 

It’s not that Carrington and Forde let down their school, coaches or teammates, it’s that the system let down the students who thrive to elevate the schools moral by putting their hearts into the game, which is what it’s all about in the first place.

Carrington has made up 291 receiving yards during the past two games while Forde has completed 12 tackles and a forced a fumble this year.
 
This suspension raises a serious flaw in the NCAA’s drug policy’s on Marijuana, especially with the United States beginning to legalize the sticky green leaf which is cleared for a widespread recreational use in four individual states including Oregon, along with the twenty-three states that have approved the medical use of cannabis products.

 

It’s not ethically reasonable for professional and college level athletes to be restrained from partaking in self medication, especially if they have the proper credentials to be using cannabis or they have residency in a state that allows recreational use of Marijuana.
 

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